Mexican American Poets

Read in honor of Diez y Seis:

The Day of Mexican Independence

Watch renowned Mexican American poets, Xánath Caraza, Carlos Cumpián, Brenda Cárdenas and Raúl Sanchez read from their work in celebration of September 16th, the day of Mexican Independence, as they each represent Chicanos' presence across the nation--outside our traditional bounds of the southwest. 

 

Our line up:


Xánath Caraza is a traveler, educator, poet, short story writer, and translator. She writes for La Bloga, and Revista Literaria Monolito. In 2020 Balamkú received second place for the Juan Felipe Herrera Best Book of Poetry Award. In 2019 for the International Latino Book Awards she received Second Place for Hudson for “Best Book of Poetry in Spanish” and Second Place for Metztli for Best Short Story Collection. In 2018 for the International Latino Book Awards she received First Place for Lágrima roja for “Best Book of Poetry in Spanish by One Author” and First Place for Sin preámbulos / Without Preamble for “Best Book of Bilingual Poetry”. Her book of poetry Syllables of Wind / Sílabas de viento received the 2015 International Book Award for Poetry. She was Writer-in-Residence at Westchester Community College, NY, 2016-2019. Caraza was the recipient of the 2014 Beca Nebrija para Creadores, Universidad de Alcalá de Henares in Spain. She was named number one of the 2013 Top Ten Latino Authors by LatinoStories.com. Her books of verse Where the Light is Violet, Black Ink, Ocelocíhuatl, Conjuro and her book of short fiction What the Tide Brings have won national and international recognition. Her other books of poetry are Perchada estás/Perching, Ejercicio en la oscuridad / An Exercise in the Darkness, Corta la piel / It Pierces the Skin, Balamkú, Le sillabe del vento, Noche de colibríes, and Corazón pintado. Caraza has been translated into English, Italian, Romanian, and Greek; and partially translated into Nahuatl, Portuguese, Hindi, and Turkish.

 

Carlos Cumpián is the author of four poetry collections: Coyote Sun (March Abrazo Press), Latino Rainbow (Children’s Press/Scholastic Books) Armadillo Charm (Tia Chucha Press), and 14 Abriles: Poems. His new manuscript is entitled Human Cicada. Cumpián has been included in more than thirty poetry anthologies, readings and workshops in the Midwest and Southwest USA. He worked public relations for the Chicago Public Library and an editor of small press journals and books from 1982 -2012 with March Abrazo Press. Cumpián has taught creative writing and poetry through community arts organizations including the National Museum of Mexican Art, and at Columbia College Chicago, University of Illinois-Chicago. Cumpián taught English and ESL for 23 years in the Chicago Public School and Charter school system. His most recent essay, “Learned to Read at My Momma’s Knee,” appears in With a Book in Their Hands: Chicano/a Readers and Readerships Across the Centuries (University of New Mexico Press, 2014). Cumpian is originally from San Antonio, Texas.

 

Brenda Cárdenas is the author of Boomerang (Bilingual Press) and the chapbooks Bread of the Earth / The Last Colors with Roberto Harrison; Achiote Seeds/Semillas de Achiote with Cristina García, Emmy Pérez, and Gabriela Erandi Rico; and From the Tongues of Brick and Stone and is currently finishing a new collection titled Trace. She also co-edited Resist Much/Obey Little: Inaugural Poems to the Resistance (Spuyten Duyvil Press) and Between the Heart and the Land: Latina Poets in the Midwest (MARCH/Abrazo Press). Cárdenas’ poems and essays have appeared or are forthcoming in Latino Poetics: The Art of Poetry; Kinship: Belonging in a World of Relations; Grabbed: Poets and Writers on Sexual Assault, Empowerment, and Healing; POETRY; Court Green; Through This Door: Wisconsin in Poems; Ghost Fishing: An Eco-Justice Anthology; The Golden Shovel Anthology; The Wind Shifts: New Latino Poetry, and the Library of Congress’ Spotlight on U.S. Hispanic Writers, among others. Cárdenas served as the 2010-2012 Milwaukee Poet Laureate, co-designed and taught the inaugural (2014) master workshop for Pintura:Palabra: A Project in Ekphrasis sponsored by the Smithsonian American Art Museum and Letras Latinas, and served as faculty for the 2021 annual writers’ retreat of CantoMundo, a national poetry organization that cultivates community for Latinx poets. She currently teaches Creative Writing and U.S. Latinx Literature at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee.

Raúl Sanchez is the current City of Redmond Poet Laureate. He teaches poetry in Spanish through the Seattle Arts and Lectures (WITS) program, also through the Jack Straw Educational Project. In the last three years he volunteered for PONGO Teen Writing at the Juvenile Detention Center. Recently, he translated Ellen Ziegler's book for the Museum of Antique Mexican Toys located in Mexico City. His forthcoming second collection "When There Were No Borders" released by Flower Song Books, McAllen Texas.

 
Immigration Border Crisis

August 19, 2021 1pm PST

As national news captures the social and political impact the flow of Central Americans is having at the US/Mexico border and beyond, this immigration phenomena has triggered a broad spectrum of attention different from the previous administration. Such as the executive branch President Biden creating a task force to reunify the hundreds of children forcibly separated from their families in an effort to address the emotional trauma to thousands of families while at a grassroots level a number of individual activists and advocacy organizations have created a support network join in the humanitarian mission along the 2000 mile border line. 

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INVITED SPEAKERS:

Elvia Diaz

Camilo Perez-Bustillo

Dulce Garcia

Eduardo Canales

Cat Rodriguez

 
Mexican American Poets

Read in honor of Diez y Seis:

The Day of Mexican Independence

Watch renowned Mexican American poets, Xánath Caraza, Carlos Cumpián, Brenda Cárdenas and Raúl Sanchez read from their work in celebration of September 16th, the day of Mexican Independence, as they each represent Chicanos' presence across the nation--outside our traditional bounds of the southwest. 

 

Our line up:


Xánath Caraza is a traveler, educator, poet, short story writer, and translator. She writes for La Bloga, and Revista Literaria Monolito. In 2020 Balamkú received second place for the Juan Felipe Herrera Best Book of Poetry Award. In 2019 for the International Latino Book Awards she received Second Place for Hudson for “Best Book of Poetry in Spanish” and Second Place for Metztli for Best Short Story Collection. In 2018 for the International Latino Book Awards she received First Place for Lágrima roja for “Best Book of Poetry in Spanish by One Author” and First Place for Sin preámbulos / Without Preamble for “Best Book of Bilingual Poetry”. Her book of poetry Syllables of Wind / Sílabas de viento received the 2015 International Book Award for Poetry. She was Writer-in-Residence at Westchester Community College, NY, 2016-2019. Caraza was the recipient of the 2014 Beca Nebrija para Creadores, Universidad de Alcalá de Henares in Spain. She was named number one of the 2013 Top Ten Latino Authors by LatinoStories.com. Her books of verse Where the Light is Violet, Black Ink, Ocelocíhuatl, Conjuro and her book of short fiction What the Tide Brings have won national and international recognition. Her other books of poetry are Perchada estás/Perching, Ejercicio en la oscuridad / An Exercise in the Darkness, Corta la piel / It Pierces the Skin, Balamkú, Le sillabe del vento, Noche de colibríes, and Corazón pintado. Caraza has been translated into English, Italian, Romanian, and Greek; and partially translated into Nahuatl, Portuguese, Hindi, and Turkish.

 

Carlos Cumpián is the author of four poetry collections: Coyote Sun (March Abrazo Press), Latino Rainbow (Children’s Press/Scholastic Books) Armadillo Charm (Tia Chucha Press), and 14 Abriles: Poems. His new manuscript is entitled Human Cicada. Cumpián has been included in more than thirty poetry anthologies, readings and workshops in the Midwest and Southwest USA. He worked public relations for the Chicago Public Library and an editor of small press journals and books from 1982 -2012 with March Abrazo Press. Cumpián has taught creative writing and poetry through community arts organizations including the National Museum of Mexican Art, and at Columbia College Chicago, University of Illinois-Chicago. Cumpián taught English and ESL for 23 years in the Chicago Public School and Charter school system. His most recent essay, “Learned to Read at My Momma’s Knee,” appears in With a Book in Their Hands: Chicano/a Readers and Readerships Across the Centuries (University of New Mexico Press, 2014). Cumpian is originally from San Antonio, Texas.

 

Brenda Cárdenas is the author of Boomerang (Bilingual Press) and the chapbooks Bread of the Earth / The Last Colors with Roberto Harrison; Achiote Seeds/Semillas de Achiote with Cristina García, Emmy Pérez, and Gabriela Erandi Rico; and From the Tongues of Brick and Stone and is currently finishing a new collection titled Trace. She also co-edited Resist Much/Obey Little: Inaugural Poems to the Resistance (Spuyten Duyvil Press) and Between the Heart and the Land: Latina Poets in the Midwest (MARCH/Abrazo Press). Cárdenas’ poems and essays have appeared or are forthcoming in Latino Poetics: The Art of Poetry; Kinship: Belonging in a World of Relations; Grabbed: Poets and Writers on Sexual Assault, Empowerment, and Healing; POETRY; Court Green; Through This Door: Wisconsin in Poems; Ghost Fishing: An Eco-Justice Anthology; The Golden Shovel Anthology; The Wind Shifts: New Latino Poetry, and the Library of Congress’ Spotlight on U.S. Hispanic Writers, among others. Cárdenas served as the 2010-2012 Milwaukee Poet Laureate, co-designed and taught the inaugural (2014) master workshop for Pintura:Palabra: A Project in Ekphrasis sponsored by the Smithsonian American Art Museum and Letras Latinas, and served as faculty for the 2021 annual writers’ retreat of CantoMundo, a national poetry organization that cultivates community for Latinx poets. She currently teaches Creative Writing and U.S. Latinx Literature at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee.

Raúl Sanchez is the current City of Redmond Poet Laureate. He teaches poetry in Spanish through the Seattle Arts and Lectures (WITS) program, also through the Jack Straw Educational Project. In the last three years he volunteered for PONGO Teen Writing at the Juvenile Detention Center. Recently, he translated Ellen Ziegler's book for the Museum of Antique Mexican Toys located in Mexico City. His forthcoming second collection "When There Were No Borders" released by Flower Song Books, McAllen Texas.

The Positive Revolution
With Daniel Osuna

July 15, 2021

Osuna has been a longtime student of the Chicano/Mexicano Movement as such he quickly became a Leader, Organizer, Public Speaker & learned the benefits of Collective Effort. His presentation 5000 year of resistance in Indio America is a recognized classic of the Xicano Indigenous movement.

“As indigenous people of the western hemisphere, we must stand up, become assertive and stop using our victimization as an excuse

for not assuming the responsibility that comes with taking

our rightful place among humanity.”

Daniel Osuna

 
Que Viva Chuy Negrete! 

June 17, 2021

Join friends and family of Dr. Jesus "Chuy" Negrete as they talk about his life, his music and his contribution to the Xicano movement over the past 50 years. With invited speakers Juanita Negrete Phillips, Rosa Negrete Livieri, Carlos Cumpian and Lalo Cervantez.

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Colegio Chicano del Pueblo

May 20, 2021

Featured Speakers: Armando Rendón, Dr. Ernesto Todd Mireles & Dr. Jerry Garcia

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INVITED SPEAKERS: 


Jorge Mujica a Chicago activist, has collaborated with many labor unions in organizing and election campaigns, picket lines, and strikes, and is a member of several community organizations dealing with Mexico-USA issues, from remittances to the right to vote from abroad. He is one of the three conveners of the historic immigrant rights marches in Chicago in 2006, and ran for the US Congress in 2009. 

Cindy Estrada is serving her third four-year term as a UAW Vice President and currently heads the Fiat Chrysler and Women’s Departments. She earned a degree in education from the University of Michigan and had planned to become a teacher. After organizing with the United Farm Workers union on an internship she was drawn to union organizing instead. 

Rudy Arredondo is founder and president of the National Latino Farmers & Ranchers Trade Association. Working in the harvesting of crops with his parents during his childhood, adolescence and in his adult life, educating and defending the labor rights of immigrants and the work of the small Latino farmers, Arredondo has lived the transformation in the fields and the impact that the growth of immigration has had in the last half century. 

Marina Del Rios,  MD, MS is Director of Social Emergency Medicine and Tenured Associate Professor in Emergency Medicine at the University of Illinois at Chicago - College of Medicine. She volunteers with the Illinois Department of Public Health COVID19 Health Equity Task Force, the Restore Illinois Health Justice Workgroup, and the City of Chicago Racial Equity Rapid Response Team. Dr. Del Rios also serves as Chair of the Health and Policy Committee of Illinois Unidos, a cross-sectoral partnership of elected and appointed officials, health professionals, and leaders of community-based organizations that aims to stop the transmission of COVID-19 and address the pandemic’s devastating public health and economic impact in Latinx communities. Her advocacy on behalf of the Latinx community during the COVID19 pandemic led to her recognition as one of Chicago Crain’s Business 2020 Notable Health Care Heroes and one of Top 50 most Influential Latinos in 2021 by Negocios Now.

Baldemar Velasquez is an American labor union activist, co-founded and president of the Farm Labor Organizing Committee, AFL-CIO. He was named a MacArthur Fellow (also known as the "Genius Grant") in 1989, and awarded the Order of the Aztec Eagle in 1994, the highest honor Mexico can bestow on a non-citizen.
 

International Mujeres' Day

FEATURING:
Yanira Merino,
Adelina Nicholls, Maria Emimlia Martin,
Teresa Romero, and Dora Cervantes

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Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo:

Where are we now?

Feb 18, 2021, Arizona 

February's Mexicanos 2070 webinar will explore the historical context of the Treaty of Guadalupe against modern social and political concerns, its modern implications regarding indigenous rights to be found in the Treaty, as well as explore the potential impact going forward on the human rights of Mexican Americans and generally indigenous peoples in the U.S.

Antonio Diaz
Ricardo Griswold Del Castillo 
Armando B. Rendon

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Featuring:

Antonio Gonzales (Cumca’Ac-Chicano) is executive director of American Indian Movement-West (AIM-West), an intertribal human rights organization based in San Francisco. Antonio worked at the International Indian Treaty Council, a UN Non-Governmental Organization (NGO) in Consultative Status in the Economic and Social Council, for nearly 30 years. In that capacity Antonio also sought to unite Chicano-Indio solidarity and unity utilizing the 1848 Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo as a catalyst for social justice and to leverage political self-determination in all aspects of human development that pertain to territories designated by the Treaty.Add your text here. Edit to add dynamic values like name, email and more.

 

Ricardo Griswold del Castillo is a Professor Emeritus of Chicana and Chicano Studies at San Diego State University and has published a number of books including The Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo: A Legacy of Conflict (University of Oklahoma Press, 1990), Cesar Chavez: A Triumph of Spirit (with Richard Garcia) (University of Oklahoma Press, 1995), and North to Aztlan: Mexican Americans in United States History (with Arnoldo De Leon), Twayne Publishers, 1996, Chicano San Diego: Cultural Space and the Struggle for Justice (University of Arizona Press, 2008); and The Power of One: Enrique Morones and the Border Angels (SDSU Press, 2013).

 

Armando B. Rendon is a writer on Chicano and indigenous-hispanic affairs, author of several young adult novels, and of Chicano Manifesto, published in 1971, reprinted in 1996. He is owner/founder of Somos en escrito Magazine, an online Latino literary magazine, launched in 2009 and an offspring, Somos en escrito Press, a Chicano-owned publishing house founded in 2020. He is also author of a thesis paper, “The Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo and Its Modern Implications for the Protection of the Human Rights of Mexican Americans (Washington, D.C., 1982).

 
 

January 21, 2021

Los Braceros: Fighting for Justice

Featuring: Rosa Martha Zarate, Abel Astorga Morales and Madeline Rios

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2020 Webinars

La Voz Del Campesino 

40 Years of KNDA

December 17, 2020


Featuring: Gilberto Alaniz and Ninfa R. Gutierrez

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COVID-19 Infections & Death Among Latinos

November 19, 2020

What Do We Know About COVID-19 Infections and Death Among Latinos?
Featuring: Dr. Rogelio Saenz and Dr. Julian Perez

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Otros Dreams en Accíon

September 17, 2020

Featuring: Maggie Loredo

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Ayotzin Nunca Mas!

The 6th Anniversary of The Night of Iguala

September 10, 2020

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XITO:

The Xicana Institute for teaching & Organizing

August 20, 2020

Featuring: Dr. Anita Fernandez

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July 16, 2020
The 1930's Repatriado: The Mass Deportation of People of Mexican Ancestry
Featuring: Elena Herrada

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June 18, 2020

Space + Time = Will: Insurgent Aztlan and National Liberation

Featuring: Dr. Ernesto "Todd" Mireles

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May 21, 2020
A New Way of Learning Thanks to Cesar Chavez, Ph.D
Featuring: Dr. Armando Arias

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A Conversation with Brown Berets

May 14, 2020

Featuring: Ralphy Avitia, Connie Gonzalez, Willie Rodriguez

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